Astronomy is boring anyway, who needs it?

Now we can thank Congress for eliminating the drudgery of astronomy curriculum. Yeah! No More Telescopes!

Cc:,,,,,,,,, “Larry Lynn” <LLynn>,,,

Subject: No More Telescopes – Congress Wants You To Squint Instead

I am writing to follow up on the below email on the cost of testing under the CPSIA. The attached document is a quote we received to test ONE telescope product under the CPSIA. The cost of the testing is a mere $24,050 for this single item. The average annual sales of this item are approximately $32,000 over the past two years. Needless to say, we cannot afford to spend $24,050 to test this (or any) item. I presume that Congress intended this result and wants us to stop selling telescopes to keep everyone safe. I guess kids can see the planets by squinting from now on. Thanks, Congress!

This absurd result is increasingly common under the destructive and poorly-conceived CPSIA. It is not surprising to me that a law born out of anger and written in a spirit of retribution has created market chaos and many unintended consequences. In my prior correspondence, I have set out many dangerous and unacceptable effects that are wreaking havoc among law-abiding companies. Good corporate citizenship is no help when facing a law which markets itself as “pro-safety” but cripples companies with unbearable financial burdens and pointlessly complex compliance requirements that redirect safety investments into bureaucracy. The CPSIA is simply an invitation by the Federal Government for all children’s products companies to find something else to do.

My letters to you are of public record. We are posting them on the Internet for all to see and read. These letters have put you on notice of many problems the CPSIA is creating. When the damage takes place, there will be no way for legislators to disclaim responsibility. I don’t want to see the destruction happen, which is why I keep writing you. It is unnecessary and will have lasting effects if not arrested now. I call on you and on Congress to act promptly to convene hearings on the effects of the CPSIA on commerce and markets, and to take immediate steps to partner with industry and the CPSC to rebuild a truly effective CPSIA to address real (not imaginary) children’s products safety issues. A stripped down, but focused, CPSIA could add a great deal of safety value without weakening companies, markets and the economy. A vindictive CPSIA salted with bitter distrust and enmity toward industry will simply gut markets and weaken the regulators’ ability to patrol markets for real safety issues. The choice is obvious – I urge Congress to choose the right path for our country.


Richard Woldenberg
Learning Resources, Inc.

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Kathleen Fasanella

Kathleen started production patternmaking in 1981. Starting in 1993, she began providing consulting and engineering services to manufacturers, small companies, and startups with an emphasis on developing owner-operator domestic cut-and-sew operations. In 2015 she opened a 5,000 sqft. fully equipped sewing factory: The Sewing Factory School. Kathleen is the author of The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Sewn Product Manufacturing, the most highly rated book of any topic in the garment industry. She's been mentioned numerous times in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Forbes, National Public Radio, Boston Globe, LA Times, Vogue, French Vogue and has at least 15 Project Runway alums at last count. Kathleen writes nearly all of the articles on and hosts its forum, the largest private online community for apparel manufacturers on the web.

2 thoughts on “Astronomy is boring anyway, who needs it?”

  1. I have proposed a solution to the telescope shortage on blog. I remember as a child, using wrapping paper (or even toilet paper) rolls as telescopes. As a child I could see the stars just fine. With high powered telescopes you need to start learning constellations, and names of stars/planets and that takes the fun out of it. The nice thing is my wrapping paper rolls can also take the place of a trumpet…just in case those disappear too!Report

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