Endorsement of the NAM Plan

On December 18, 2008, The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) submitted an exhaustively inclusive 15 page document (pdf) in response to the CPSC’s request for comments. It is the position of this site to heartily endorse this plan. Furthermore, NAM is commended for their proactive action in this matter.

Other entities supporting the plan:

  • American Apparel & Footwear Association
  • Association of American Publishers
  • Book Manufacturers Institute, Inc.
  • Fashion Jewelry Trade Association
  • Juvenile Product Manufacturers Association
  • National Association of Manufacturers
  • National Association of Printing Ink Manufacturers
  • National Retail Federation
  • Retail Industry Leaders Association
  • Printing Industries of America
  • Specialty Graphic Imaging Association
  • Toy Industry Association
  • Fashion-Incubator.com

Feel free to comment if you’re not represented by one of these groups. For the greatest impact, consider printing the plan and mailing it to the address included in the header. Be sure to include your contact information with your statement that you support it.

Published by

Kathleen Fasanella

Kathleen started production patternmaking in 1981. Starting in 1993, she began providing consulting and engineering services to manufacturers, small companies, and startups with an emphasis on developing owner-operator domestic cut-and-sew operations. In 2015 she opened a 5,000 sqft. fully equipped sewing factory: The Sewing Factory School. Kathleen is the author of The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Sewn Product Manufacturing, the most highly rated book of any topic in the garment industry. She's been mentioned numerous times in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Forbes, National Public Radio, Boston Globe, LA Times, Vogue, French Vogue and has at least 15 Project Runway alums at last count. Kathleen writes nearly all of the articles on Fashion-Incubator.com and hosts its forum, the largest private online community for apparel manufacturers on the web.

4 thoughts on “Endorsement of the NAM Plan”

  1. I understand why this is being done but why are we being punished for what China has done?

    Why can’t this law be targeted to the manufacturers not the small business stay at home moms who create stuff with their products?

    We barely break even or make a small income off of our creations.

    This won’t only effect us. It will effect all of the manufactures who we buy ribbon and supplies from. It will effect all of the craft shows that are held all over the country. There will be no more income making shows because “we” crafters will not be able to afford to have all of our items tested.

    There has to be a happy medium for us to meet with this issue. You just can’t take this away from us the way you are planning to.

    What happened to our freedom? $$$$$$$$$$….that is all you think about. There is no common sense being used here. Everything is political. This is not hurting the politicians, it is hurting us, Americans. This is not fair to us.

  2. I am a single mother.My family is soley supported by me.How do I do this????I design,sew and sell custom children’s clothes.I understand this law was created to help children but how many children will this hurt.I can tell you about 3 children it will hurt.My children!!! If this law nakes it where I cannot sell my creations then my children will have no home,no food or anything else for that matter.

  3. I understand why this is being done but why are we being punished for what China has done?

    China isn’t being punished. News flash, all those products shipped over from China are companies owned by US residents. There’s no nefarious plot hatched up by the Chinese to poison our kids. It’s US citizens and residents. They failed to monitor their contractors in the ways some moms fail to mind their kids.

    Why can’t this law be targeted to the manufacturers not the small business stay at home moms who create stuff with their products?

    “Manufacture” means to make by hand. If you’re making stuff to sell, you are a manufacturer. That is the law. The tiniest restaurant has to follow the same safety laws that the large chain restaurants do.

    There will be no more income making shows because “we” crafters will not be able to afford to have all of our items tested.

    Unfortunately, this has been introduced as a cost of doing business.

    There has to be a happy medium for us to meet with this issue. You just can’t take this away from us the way you are planning to.

    I’m not planning to. I’m on your side.

    What happened to our freedom? $$$$$$$$$$….that is all you think about. Everything is political. This is not hurting the politicians, it is hurting us, Americans. This is not fair to us.

    Again, I’m on your side and I happen to care a whole lot more about things other than money but I don’t think “fairness” enters into the equation. It’s not an issue of freedom either. Here’s from another site on coping with the crisis:

    With respect to the tiniest of producers, I think an issue that has not been discussed openly is the conflict born of entitlement, often expressed in blogs and forums across the web as “freedom”. As the system existed, they had the freedom and entitlement to conduct their affairs as they saw fit and it won’t be that way anymore. It is only natural to resent that. We all resent forced change but it’s not practical to wallow in it or throw fits about it. Even under ideal modifications, this law will force many to either become more professional or get into something else. If this is something you love, it can only rankle being forced to put on a suit that’s too new or big for you. The truth is though, the only difference between many Etsy and eBay sellers and members of our forum is not company size but professionalism (for some reason, visitors and forum guests think we’re all big companies).

    It boils down to forcing a commitment where there once was freedom and explains why men resist proposing marriage. This law may force the decision among tiny producers to become more serious about it. I don’t know how they can comply with the labeling requirements if they’re not using better management and tracking methods. And it’s not that they must use full-bore practices used by the largest firms (we don’t) but they’ll need to mature and adopt accepted standards that stand the test of time (in my book). For what it’s worth, if I were a tiny producer, I’d resent any of these options. It doesn’t seem quite fair if you’re used to doing things your own way and want or need to be flexible. It doesn’t feel fair to take something away from you that you’ve always had. But there are options. It may be possible for some of our members to sell yardage they’re not using to smaller producers and pass along the mill’s certifications. We just have to work together -which is another reason to mind your rhetoric. Nobody will sell you anything if you’ve been posturing with them vs us.

  4. I manufacture items for special needs and autistic children. The primary components of my products are fabric and thread. Neither of these items have EVER been considered a hazard.

    The small manufacturer cannot justify the expense of testing. My batches are under 20.

    If my business closes my customers will be forced to go without needed products or purchase from the big manufacurers…think China. I would like to add the cost of my items is at least 50% cheaper for the buyer than those from the big box people.

    Additionally, my closure will result in the loss of more than one job.

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